Saturday, October 31, 2015

2 More Local Lincoln Statues

Statue at Public library in Covington, courtesy abrahamlincolnonline

Up lose view courtesy cov200tour.com


Statue at Chase College of Law, courtesy chase law.nku.edu

Cropped version 

I just found out about two more local statues of Abraham Lincoln, and though these apparently created no controversy like the uproar over the work by George Barnard Gray, they also feature the younger, unbearded Lincoln. This is another instance of how writing this blog has allowed me to learn something, though I do,admit embarrassment about not knowing of these sooner. Oh well. Now I know.

Most statues of the Lincoln seem to show him as President, with his famous facial hair. Perhaps this shows that it was that stage of his life and career that became most memorable, because of the war and/or the Emancipation Proclamation. Of course, just the office of President brought him fame that his previous careers could not, so it is probably seems that this older, bearded Lincoln would be the most well-known and remembered and, thus the most likely yo be featured in works of art. 

Here is an excerpt from the description of the statue outside the Covington library from my favorite 
Lincoln website, Abraham Lincoln Online.

Sculptor Matt Langford has depicted what Lincoln might have looked like as a young man, when he experienced a period of struggle and self-education. Two symbols help represent Lincoln's life at this time -- the ax, which helped to support himself, and a book, which speaks of his aspirations. A plaque on the base reads, "I shall prepare myself. Someday my chance will come."

Langford, who lives in an antebellum log cabin in nearby Union, hopes to inspire younger generations with this image of a future president who rose from his humble Kentucky origins through hard work, disciplined study, and determination.

I believe that both of these were commissioned by Oakley and Eve Farris, local philanthropists.

I will try to visit these to get some of my own pictures and observations as soon as I can.

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